Getting around Cabarete - Swell Surf Camp amazing Caribbean Surf Camp Holiday with Yoga in the Caribbean for Social and Active people

Getting around Cabarete

TRANSPORTATION IN CABARETE

And a quick guide on ‘how to ride bitch

Our clients get picked up by our drivers at the airport on their way to Swell and in the mornings, our clients go with Michel’s van to Playa Encuentro. The rest of the transportation from Swell to bars and restaurants can be done by foot, since Swell is so centrally located.

But if you don’t want to walk, for example to go to Kitebeach for lunch or a kite session, there is a very popular mode of transportation in and around Cabarete: The Moto Concho (moto taxi) and you will find them every where in town. You don’t have to look for them, they’ll find you, anywhere in town, especially along Cabarete’s main road. In fact, anyone walking along the road will soon get a quick whistle, offering a ride.

Prices:  20 -50 pesos in town, with lower prices during the day and higher prices at night and an extortionate amount when they know you are drunk (which is a time by the way when you should definitely not be on the back of a moto!), or when they know that you have no idea about the going moto-concho rates (usually a lack of a sun tan will give them a clue).

Payment: Note: A moto concho driver never has change (or so they tell you), so try to make sure to have 20 or 50 pesos on you. They will not even give you change from 500 pesos (12 dollars).

The ‘Dominican Tattoo’  Beware: motorbike exhausts are HOT!  A leg-burn from an exhaust pipe is so common when you are riding ‘bitch’ that it even has a name!

How to: Well watch this video to find the right etiquette for ‘riding bitch’. Applies to moto concho’s and rides with friends (our personal favorite is the ‘Meerkat’).

 

SEE YOU SOON IN CABARETE!

Interested in an active adventure holiday? we got something for you too

Follow Us on Instagram

  • Think of Swell as the anti-surf camp. There’s plenty of surfing, of course, but the similarities to other camps end there. For starters, the rooms are stylish — more boutique hotel than reggae-loving surfer digs. Then there are the legendary breakfasts (omelettes, pancakes and crepes, fresh-squeezed orange juice, and fruit bowls). Structured lessons take place each morning, with an instructor alongside you and the head surf coach watching from shallow water, ready to offer tips between rides.”

     

    Reference Source:
    [Frommer’s Travel Guides]

  • “The Dominican Republic has it all!”

    We hope you will join us on a Caribbean Surf Holiday in the Domican Republic.

    Swell Surf Camp firm

    Find out more about Swell Surf Camp